Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet 2

Lenovo’s influential laptop designs are legendary. Despite being, in most cases, re-branded IBM computers, there was a time when the Lenovo laptop was the only model to be certified for use in outer space (I’m not joking). The Lenovo ThinkPad 2 tablet is hoping to take this tradition of quality merchandise and trusted branding into the world of the tablet PC. In the process, Lenovo are hoping to exercise the demons awakened by this tablet’s predecessor…

Yes, the original Thinkpad was a bit crap. It wasn’t stunningly awful, but it certainly wasn’t anyone’s tablet of the year. Why not? Well, for starters the battery life was shorter than Mini-Me’s understudy. Secondly, the general operation of the computer was slower than Wayne Rooney’s Sudoku record. Thirdly, Android doesn’t really do that many ‘pen friendly’ apps.

So, how is this new version different? Let’s find out…

THE SPECS

The first major difference between the Thinkpad 1 and the latest model is the OS. The original model ran Android, but not especially well. This new version runs Windows 8 and is, dare I say it, much better for it. Lenovo principally make computers for Windows, so having them back on home territory can only be a good thing.

The second thing you’re likely to notice is that the bodywork has been completely overhauled. This new ThinkPad now comes complete with a rubberised finish that feels comfortable and pleasing to touch, a vastly improved screen (1366 x 768, nicer, but still not HD) and a cute little keyboard that is fantastic, both to look at and to use.

The ThinkPad 2 is lighter than the older model (from 1.58lbs to 1.3 lbs) and you get about 8 hours of battery life.

THE PRICE

Available at around £430, this is actually one of the cheaper Windows 8 tablets around. It’s a bit pricier than other hybrids, of course, but is probably worth the extra money in the long run. If you really want Windows 8 on your tablet, but you don’t want to pay the funny money, this one could be a decent choice.

NOTE: Sadly, the keypad itself will set you back another £80, bringing the total up about £510. This is still a decent price compared to some of the others out there, however.

THE PERFORMANCE

This tablet performs pretty well. The processing speed is suitably fast and the general look and feel of the tablet implies comfort, durability and professionalism. It handles the Internet with no problems at all and the apps also work well without hiccups.

One minor annoyance is the pen. That stylus just doesn’t want to come out of its friggin’ holster. Ever. It’s actually embarrassing when you’re in public and struggling to pull the f****r out.

As a negative point, I wouldn’t say that there was anything especially exciting about this tablet. It works fine; it’s not the fastest tablet in the West, nor is it the most energy efficient model ever. It is neither great value nor a ripoff and it runs Windows 8, which is a plus or a minus, depending on your perspective.

It is, however, miles better than the previous model. It represents a genuinely huge improvement on the ThinkPad 1.

THE VERDICT

Generally speaking, I liked this tablet. I don’t know if it will feature on anybody’s ‘best of the year’ lists, as I said of its predecessor, but that doesn’t make the ThinkPad 2 a bad tablet.

All in all, it’s just a standard Windows 8 tablet. Don’t expect a dazzling Retina display, don’t expect the hardware of the Microsoft Surface, don’t expect the brand pull of some of the other tablets out there and don’t expect a major bargain. What you see is a nicely made, reliable tablet at a reasonable price.

And what you see is ultimately what you’ll get. 

PC Shipments Mark Steepest Decline With 10 Percent Drop

With very little information on the internet about tablet pc’s, it is very rare when we get a chance to re post, with permission, an article from this industry.

Personal-computer shipments fell 10 percent in 2013, marking the worst-ever decline after lackluster holiday sales underscored how consumers and businesses are shunning machines for mobile devices, two research firms said.

Manufacturers shipped 315.9 million units, returning to 2009 levels and making it the “worst decline in PC market history,” researcher Gartner Inc. said in a statement yesterday. IDC also said shipments had a record decline.

U.S. consumers omitted PCs from their holiday shopping lists while buyers in Asia opted for smartphones and tablets. More computing tasks are moving to websites and applications tailored for wireless gadgets, rather than software installed on laptops and desktops. The annual drop eclipsed the previous record decline of 3.9 percent in 2012, Gartner said.

“Consumer spending during the holidays did not come back to PCs as tablets were one of the hottest holiday items,” said Mikako Kitagawa, an analyst at Stamford, Connecticut-based Gartner. “In emerging markets, the first connected device for consumers is most likely a smartphone, and their first computing device is a tablet.”

Global sales fell 6.9 percent in the fourth quarter — the seventh straight drop — to 82.6 million units, Gartner said. IDC, based in Framingham, Massachusetts, reported a decline of 5.6 percent in the same period.

Corporate Upgrades

Lenovo Group Ltd. (996) maintained the No. 1 spot worldwide with 18.1 percent market share in the fourth quarter, helped by a 6.6 percent increase in shipments, according to Gartner. Hewlett-Packard Co. (HPQ) was second with a 16.4 percent share as shipments declined 7.2 percent. Dell Inc. was third, the researcher said.

“We are extremely optimistic about the future of the $200 billion-plus PC industry,” Yang Yuanqing, Lenovo’s chairman and chief executive officer, said in a statement. “We continue to outperform the market while steadily improving profit and margin.”

Lenovo shipped 14 million PCs in the last quarter, it said.

Growth in the PC market has become dependent on consumers and businesses replacing existing machines, rather than wooing new buyers. Enterprise demand is being driven in part by Microsoft Corp. (MSFT)’s plan to end support for its 13-year-old Windows XP operating system in April, compelling businesses to buy new PCs along with software upgrades.

U.S. shipments shrank 7.5 percent in the fourth quarter to 15.8 million units, Gartner said. Unit sales in Europe, the Middle East and Africa fell 6.7 percent to 25.8 million, while the Asia-Pacific region saw a 9.8 percent decline to 26.5 million.

Photographer: Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg

Loren Loverde, an analyst at IDC, said the decline in PC shipments was the worst since the researcher started tracking data in 1981, with the previous record seen in 2001, when sales shrank 3.7 percent.

“We don’t think it’s quite the bottom yet,” Loverde said. IDC is predicting a 3.8 percent decline in PC shipments for 2014 this year, and then growth of less than 1 percent in 2015, he said.

Source – http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-01-09/pc-shipments-drop-6-9-percent-in-weak-holiday-shopping.html

Tesco Hudl Spec

Hudl’ is not actually a word, at least, not in any language that I know of. I think Tesco only named it that so they could cannily abbreviate their ‘Hudl User Group’ to HUG (no, really). Oh yes, while we’re on the subject, you did indeed read that first part right; this is a tablet PC manufactured by Tesco.

Tesco.

OK.

What next? Missile defence systems designed by Dominos Pizza? Lunar Landing Module’s supplied by ASDA? (Just expect them either far too early or far too late), mobile smartphones designed by my local fish n chip shop? Continue reading

Top 5 Tablets To Buy This year

2013 has been a roller coaster year for tablets and for technology in general, and although a lot of that can be attributed to a giant lamp voiced by Bill Nighy (and if you missed the reference then you missed out on one of the year’s best movies), even more still can be ascribed to the good taste and ludicrously high standards (“what do you mean there’s no ‘time travel’ app!?) of YOU, the British consumer.

In order to continue this upward trend, we put our heads together and compiled a list of the year’s best tablets. You may be surprised at what comes first (actually, no, you won’t. We’ll say that right now. There are no surprises waiting for you at number one). Anyway, read on… Continue reading

Transferring photos taken on your camera to the amazon kindle fire hd with out a PC

The short answer is no, you possibly can’t. I’m sad, but that’s just the best way it is.

Though, all hope is not lost in spite of this dreadful news. There are a couple of main avenues you can still go down.

The very first is to easily email the photos to yourself and acquire them to your Kindle. This method works fine if you simply need several holiday snaps or pictures of your little nephew’s birthday or whatever, but its not much use for a large amount of photos. Continue reading

Tablet Wars: Who’s Xooming Whom?

With a Xoom well past it’s death, namely inside the first indoctrination of the apple ipad, here is a glance at an article from the time, with a honeycomb android operating System, there are several commentators saying it is the big rival to the apple ipad, and all seem to be looking forward to the opportunity for this tablet pc. The motorola xoom is a dead duck, a enthusiasts thing if you can get hold of one, and lost in the chronicle of that pc tablet. It is charming isn’t it

Who Invented the Tablet PC?

That’s actually quite tough to pinpoint. Computer scientist Alan Kay first came up with a concept (and then a prototype) for what he called a ‘Dynabook’ in 1968. Depending on which version you look at, the Dynabook concept can be viewed as a prototype tablet PC (as well as a direct ancestor of the laptop).

 

In science fiction, tablet-like devices can be seen in ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ as well as ‘Star Trek: The Next Generation’. While in comics, Jack Kirby’s ‘Motherboxes’ (as featured in the 1970’s ‘New Gods’ series) can be considered to be ‘super-tablets’ by any other name. So the idea for the tablet was firmly entrenched in fiction and popular culture long before the iPad was even a glint in Steve Jobs’ eye.  Continue reading

Review: Razer Edge Pro tablet—insane performance that’s completely impractical

This is time that microsoft window 8 makes its mark inside the tablet pc market. With the revolutionary nokia tablet, the microsoft surface 2 plus a few others (counting the Razer Edge Pro, that’s essentially what this short article is about). We’ll be considering several more come out before next december. The Razer Edge Pro is somewhat disappointing in comparison to everything else that is out on the market (apple ipad, asus nexus 7) but read to the end to find out the final assesment of the pc tablet. Continue reading

The LeapPad Explorer 2 Kid’sTablet Review

So let’s face facts, your kids can (and will) eventually get hold of your tablet. The lure of it being a “grown up” toy, combined with the fact that it both lights up and has buttons, not to mention the many, many warnings you’ve given them not to touch it will by now have made it an irresistible goal. In all probability, they are planning to grab your prize technological possession as you read this.  Continue reading

Tablets set to outsell PCs by the end of the year

Editors Note – The writing was on the wall the first time Steve Jobs stood up on that platform on January 27, 2010 and showed everyone the future of computing. The pc tablet has changed the best way we take part in games, compose letters and work away from the office, So this news story about a drop of 13% in sales of laptops and a rise of 7percent in sales of pc tablets, is not unexpected 3 years on. It is only going to grow for that little tablet pc with apple continuously innovating, microsoft beginning to move into the industry with their windows 8 tablet pc’s and google’s android spreading out its market share faster than anyone else, it is difficult to see how a laptop or maybe the desktop can contend. Continue reading