RFID and AIDC News: What is Zebra’s Strategy for Motorola’s Mobile Wireless and Data Collection Businesses?

In early 2014, printing and RFID system focused Zebra Technologies announced it was acquiring the “Enterprise Systems” business from Motorola Solutions, in a deal that closed in late October. That left Motorola to focus on its radio systems business.

It was a somewhat surprising move, certainly moving Zebra up the supply chain food change. What was the strategy behind the deal? How fast and how far will the integration of Motorola into Zebra go? Is Zebra now a “solutions” company?

SCDigest editor Dan Gilmore recently interviewed Mike Terzich, Zebra’s Chief Administrative Officer who is leading the integration program, on these and several other topics.

Gilmore: Mike, before we start talking about the Motorola Enterprise acquisition, you’ve been around the Auto ID industry for two decades. Not long ago, it was a very recognized and defined space. Now, not so much. It doesn’t receive much press coverage at all today, though SCDigest is trying to rectify that a bit. Is it because it’s just so easy to make it work today that end users just don’t need much education any more?

Terzich: I think part of the reason that it has evolved the way it has is that if you look at who the industry icons were back in the day, the Intermecs, the Symbols [Symbol Technologies], the Telxons, the Hand Held Products, Datamax – all of them have been consolidated up into large industrial conglomerates. Zebra is really one of the last of the independents.

For years, you had so much independent development, and every manufacturer had their own operating language and everything was proprietary, so that added a dimension of complexity that users had to deal with. Over time, as architectures became more open and interoperable, the mystery kind of disappeared on how to implement and integrate this stuff. The question now is not really about the technical aspects, but issues like how to optimize my assets across my supply chain network. Today it is much more of an application and business question than it is a technical one with Auto ID.

Gilmore: I must admit the Motorola announcement took me a bit by surprise, though it was clear there were some tensions within the old Motorola Solutions between the radio side and the wireless and data collection businesses. What was Zebra’s strategy in making this deal?

Terzich: A little bit history – we tried to be part of the opportunity back in 2006 and 2007 when Symbol Technologies was put on the market and eventually found its way to Motorola. We made a pitch at the time – I was personally involved – and as I like to say we were a day late and a dollar short in terms of making a deal.

So our interest level from a strategic perspective has really been in place for seven years. So when the opportunity re-presented itself last year, our CEO Anders Gustafsson and Motorola started to have some conversations. For us, it was always about the attraction of where we saw the market evolving, and this whole concept around enterprise apps and intelligence, the interest of companies to optimize across their value chains, and we felt that the combination of Zebra and the enterprise mobility business from Motorola made complete sense because it allowed us to offer a broader portfolio and a higher percentage of the solution offering.

For us, it also allows us to become closer to the application development side of the business. As a printing company, while we had a vision and an aspiration to be part of where enterprises were willing to go in terms of managing their business, it’s hard to lead application and solution development around your brand when you’re the printing component. Printing has become almost second nature today, while the wireless business and the portfolio Motorola has there in terms of mobile computing and the trends were we seeing with Cloud-based application development, the Internet of Things, asset optimization, and ubiquitous mobility – that’s what enticed us to say this is still a very relevant strategic opportunity today as it was back in 2007.

Gilmore: I understand you have rather fully integrated Motorola in already. I would have thought that initially, given the very different nature of the business, that you would have started with it as separate SBU. I also understand you are quickly getting rid of the Motorola brand name in favor of it all being Zebra Technologies. Is that correct, and if Yes, what was the thinking?

Terzich: It’s semi-correct. Where we are integrated is in our go-to-market strategy and our face to the customer. When you look at where Motorola Enterprise Mobility was selling, who their customers were and their routes to market, it was a combination of strategically calling on some very large end users and a significant reseller and integrator channel. It turned out that the amount of common end user customers and channel partners between Zebra and Motorola Enterprise is really quite significant.

So we had the opportunity to integrate sales forces, and when you think about it through the eyes of the sales team, your carrying more products in your sales bag, you are selling largely to the same channel partners that Zebra and Motorola were both selling to independently. The largest end users are mostly customers in common, so there was some natural synergistic opportunity in our go to market model.

Where we have remained separate is in the R&D and development side, because the product lines are complementary not competitive, and over time Motorola’s competency in mobile computing, data collection and wireless networks are unique skill sets for us. So we are maintaining separate engineering and product development organizations, but we come together with a common global sales and marketing organization.

Gilmore: And what about the branding? Is the Motorola name gone, it is now all Zebra Technologies going forward?

Terzich: From a contractual/legal perspective, we have to get off the name and the “batwings” [the Motorola logo] as part of the transaction, so it’s not like we have a choice. We can however leverage the Symbol Technologies brand, and we are going to do that as a product brand is some isolated areas. But Symbol as a name has been out of circulation for about seven years, and while it has some affinity say in the reseller community, the long term strategy is that everything will be branded Zebra Technologies.

But in the transitional period there will be some product that have to transfer to a Symbol products sub-brand as a means to get off of the Motorola bat wings.

Gilmore: What’s your take on wireless systems market? It really now is just down in the US to just two major players, Honeywell and now Zebra. Is it is still a good market, a growth market?

Terzich: What’s interesting about the combination is we’re now number one in mobile computing, number one in data collection, and number one in printing. We have a very large global service organization. And then you get to wireless LAN, and that’s the fifth of our major revenue buckets.

What’s interesting about wireless LAN is that it has the highest growth profile of any of those segments, but clearly Motorola’s position here is not number 1. You have some very large players [e.g., Cisco] that operate in a more horizontal market mode, and focus generally on more “carpeted” areas of a business, versus a distribution center or shop floor or a retail store. I think Motorola had done a nice job of carving out a niche relative to some markets that we service, principally in the retail and some of the hospitality markets, and the product has been successful and we have quite a bit of customer loyalty in these sectors.

So our strategy going forward from a wireless LAN perspective is to be very vertically focused and application specific where the product has some advantages, and to build off that customer loyalty. We don’t think the answer is to compete broadly in the wireless LAN marketplace because we don’t have the R&D engine or the brand equity in some of those markets or applications.

So we are going to stick to our knitting, which will concentrated in retail, hospitality and healthcare, where our product seems to resonate.

Gilmore: You and Motorola use primarily a channels strategy. Are you in the solutions business, and can you do that if you use a channels strategy and are one-step removed from the customer?

Terzich: Great question.

One of the things that most people don’t realize is that Zebra, organically before the Motorola acquisition, had about 80% of its business through channels and about 20% through some large, named strategic accounts. And those accounts tended to be some very sophisticated adopters of technology that effectively act as their own systems integrator.

These are large retailers, large transportation companies, and large manufacturers that well understand how to deploy technology to drive efficiency and productivity. So that was our composite, and Motorola’s was very similar, the difference being that because Motorola offered enterprise mobile computing, they tended to call a little higher in those organizations, and they worked more closely with application developers and independent software developers because usually the real problem is solved by application software and re-engineering of business processes.

So Motorola may have been calling on maybe 40% of its revenue from a strategic account perspective, and that means they had a seat at the end user table and they are influencing those companies, even if those are sometimes still being fulfilled through channels.

So where do we fall in the solutions spectrum? Both product lines do not constitute a solution by themselves, they still need to connect to application software and that requires integration support. So the channel will remain a very vital part of the strategy.

At a very simple level, we see that there are opportunities for better enabling application software. So how do we make mobile printing devices and mobile computing and data collection devices better together from a product design set? How do we make our technology more interoperable and attractive for application development?

When you look at this technology and how ubiquitous it is you, find that deployment is really though many hundreds of application developers. You don’t see a small number of applications as being really dominant. Our job is to continue to work with those developers to make our solutions as easy to integrate with them as we can.

No CIO or CFO goes to bed at night thinking “I need to bar code something.” But they do wake up and say I need to take a billion dollars out my supply chain, or whatever the figure is. What we do is often a key piece of what becomes the strategy to achieve those goals.

Gilmore: If I understand it right, you have released your own Voice solution, originally developed by Motorola’s Psion unit in Europe, here into the US market. Before, Motorola relied exclusively on partners here for Voice software. What is the strategy?

Terzich: Ultimately, Voice as a technology is just another extension of using mobility to make operations more productive and efficient, especially in warehousing applications. So it’s really just a continuum to us of bringing more capability to those that are trying to optimize workflow. Workflow has become without question one of the biggest areas of opportunity across anyone’s supply chain. This is part of why we are so excited about the combined portfolio in general, and our Voice solution is part of that.

Gilmore: Mike, appreciate you sharing your insight today.

Terzich: Thanks Dan. I enjoyed the conversation.

For more information and conversation visit the source of this article – http://www.scdigest.com/ontarget/15-02-04-1.php?cid=8965

Legalize it? Colo. considers one-ear, in-car headsets

Colorado could become more friendly for hands-free talking under a proposed tweak to state traffic law.

The bill would specifically legalize the use of one-ear headsets by drivers, if connected to a mobile phone.

Current Colorado law bans the use of “earphones” behind the wheel, which is defined as “any headset, radio, tape player, or other similar device which provides the listener with radio programs, music, or other recorded information through a device attached to the head and which covers all of or a portion of the ears.”

While that definition does not specifically cover phone calls, it leaves enough ambiguity in law that a small group of House Democrats wants to clear it up.

HB 1207 would add an exception to the definition of “earphones” in state law, to exempt: “a headset that only covers all or a 10 portion of one ear and that is connected to a wireless, hand-held telephone.”

The house transportation committee unanimously passed the bill on Thursday morning.

Colorado law does not specifically address the issue of hands-free phone use versus calls made with a handset held to the driver’s head. Under Colorado law, adults are allowed to engage in phone calls behind the wheel, while minors are not.

Numerous scientific studies conclude that hands-free talking is not significantly safer for drivers than talking with the phone held to the ear.

More important than tying up a hand is the fact that engaging in a phone conversation ties up the brain, splitting a driver’s attention between the call and the road and using a significant chunk of the brains cognitive capacity when it would be better applied to the task of driving.

In 2013, Colorado police officers reported that 1,311 crashes were caused at least in part by distraction due to a cell phone, roughly the same number caused by distractions from passengers actually in the cars that crashed.

That statistic does not differentiate between the use of a phone for talking versus texting. Texting behind the wheel is illegal for drivers of all ages in Colorado.

Source - http://www.9news.com/story/tech/personal-tech/2015/02/11/one-ear-headsets-drivers/23234425/

What Type Of Kenwood Radio Earpiece Should You Use With A Kenwood Radio

Although there are multiple types and designs of Kenwood radios out there, there are only two earpiece connectors compatible with these radios. Kenwood has been able to design their earpiece connectors in such a way that they are compatible with all their vast types of radios. A large percentage of Kenwood radios utilize the 2 pin earpiece connector. Among the most popular radios using the 2 pin earpiece connector include TK3000 and TK3300. The difference between the two-pin connector and the multi pin connector is straightforward. The former features two pins while the latter features multiple pins. However, their performance may not be the same depending on usability and the type of Kenwood radio.

The Two-Pin Earpiece Connector

The earpiece of the Kenwood 2 pin connector is featured by an incredible in-line push-to-talk button (PTT) with an in-built microphone. In addition, it comes with a complete clothing clip and a surveillance acoustic audio tube. This Kenwood earpiece connector can be used with most of the Kenwood radios and it normally sells out at a fair price.

This Kenwood radio earpiece connector is Kevlar reinforced for added security. It also features a secure fit tube connector as well as the lapel clip button. These features integrate themselves easily thus ensuring that the final sound output is of high quality. They are also designed with hi-tech microphones which help in reducing the noise level. Unlike other connectors, its wire PTT (microphone) and acoustic tube are separate. This is meant to reduce the amount of vibrations and echoes produced which would otherwise compromise the sound quality.

When it comes to style, the Kenwood radio earpiece connector is a RoHS compliant connector which has the ‘Over the ear’ FBI style acoustic tube which helps in monitoring sound levels. When you see that the plugs have worn out, there is no reason to worry because these pieces feature replaceable mushroom plugs. This is a changeable earpiece connector which allows you to change the connector to the accessory available. Apart from being compatible with Kenwood two-pin, it also works well other devices such as Motorola 2 pin and Icom 2 pin.

The Multi-Pin Earpiece Connector

The Kenwood multi-pin connected earpiece is a unique and tech savvy type of earpiece. But the earpiece is the same to the 2 pin connected earpiece in other areas. For example, both of them share very important features crucial to the audio type produced. Some of these identical features include an in-line PTT button, the surveillance acoustic tube and the clothing clip. When it comes to its value, it is a little bit pricy than the two-pin version.

The Kenwood Radio Earpieces

The performance and aesthetics of every Kenwood radio earpiece can be fostered by spending a little bit more on optional features such as the ‘swivel’ ear loop. Also, you can enjoy better use and comfort by including a steel clothing clip that reduces noise. Kenwood composes their earpieces from high quality cables featuring a toughened surface. The durable surface protects the cable from accidental strain and offers exemplary cushion to wear and tear. These pieces are lightweight allowing them to be carried and used in wherever you travel. They have been designed to withstand consistent strains common with all earpieces making it easier to be used in any environment.

Actually, the types of connectors which are compatible with Kenwood radios are limited compared to its counterparts. Nevertheless, the Kenwood two-pin and multi-pin connectors provide an excellent performance in all Kenwood’s radios making other connectors of no importance. But some people would say it is worth trying using other connectors to taste the difference. Kenwood radio earpieces consist of polycarbonate microphones which cushions your ears from unexpected high sound levels. When the acoustic tube gets damaged it can be easily replaced ensuring that communication remains uninterrupted. Also, the button or the controller is strategically placed allowing easier management of communication.

Most of Kenwood 2 way radios may only be connected by the two varieties of connectors. Thankfully, their equipment is among the best and it can hardly be rivaled. If you would want to have a Kenwood radio for your company, it is futile searching other compatible connectors because the aforementioned two works superbly. Many companieskenwood because of these hi-tech unparalleled features. Remember that, to gain advantage of uninterrupted communication, safe audio output and additional exclusive capabilities you will have to consider a good earpiece connector for your radio.

The Barcelona connection

Luis Enrique arrived at the Camp Nou famous for being a man that likes to take care of every tiny detail. One of the most striking techniques that the manager uses is the use of advanced technology during the game to improvise and adopt new tactics on the fly.

It is common to see Juan Carlos Unzue, his assistant manager, wearing an earpiece with which he receives vital information. But who is at the other end of this technology and what is being said?

Two people from Luis Enrique’s team position themselves higher up in the stadium. From their elevated position, Robert Moreno and Joan Barbara can see how everyone is moving around on the pitch, the spaces that are being made, the chances that might be had. With this privileged information, they speak directly to Unzue down in the dugout, who in turn talks to the Barca manager.

Barbara has known Luis Enrique since the Asturian coached Barcelona’s B team. The man’s keen eye and experience in evaluating the other team’s strengths and weaknesses are invaluable. What he thinks is relevant he tells Moreno, who passes it on directly to Unzue wearing the earpiece.

This way of working is nothing new. Guardiola used the mobile in his time at Barcelona. One of his assistants used to talk to him on the phone from high up, giving his perspective of the game. The man doing the calling was Carlos Naval. Today, Luis Enrique has now perfected the technique that he adopted when training Barca B in the 2010-11 season.

Earpiece comes in handy for hands-free phone

This can be found on this web site, please enjoy

The last time I remember being hands free was when I was in high school, riding my bicycle hands free.

No hands on the handlebars while I bicycled with my golf clubs to Green Acres – no kidding – Country Club in Donnellson, Iowa. My 10-speed was a marvel in balance. It certainly helped that Donnellson was flat and the streets well-paved, as well as completely lacking in traffic.

I could maneuver the mile to the golf course without putting my hands on the handlebars, except to make turns. It probably was dangerous, and police probably would pull me over now for hands-free bicycling.

Why I didn’t crumple up into a pile of bicycle and blood is beyond me. But I had hardly a care in the world when I was biking to the golf course or other points in between. And this was before helmets and the notion of traumatic brain injuries. I was just a kid.

Now, hands free takes on a new meaning in Illinois. It’s not about bicycling; it’s about driving.

And, as of Jan. 1, it is illegal to talk on your cellphone while driving if you are holding it up to your ear. Police can pull you over if they see you and give you a $75 ticket first time out. And if you don’t get it the first time, the second time you are pulled over, the ticket is $100. After four times, you could have your license suspended.

I don’t want a ticket. No call is worth $75. And you would have to be plain dumb to lose your license over cellphones.

I’ve had a cellphone for almost nine years; I think it came inside our wedding cake. For all my life, I had been tied to the landline, only it wasn’t called a landline. It was called a telephone, and it was attached to the wall. And if you wanted to make a call, you were attached to the wall.

I was a latecomer to cellphones. In fact, I was anti-cellphone. If I had a cellphone, it meant that I was connected to the world at all times; there was no getting away from it. Of course, if it rang, you would answer it. No matter where you were. In the living room. In the bathroom. Egad. In the car. There was no escaping the world with a cellphone. I wanted that escape.

But I’ve come to find out that I do not receive a lot of telephone calls. And I do not make a lot of telephone calls. I haven’t done a thorough analysis, but I think most of the telephone calls I receive come from my pharmacy, my friendly pharmacy. Completely computer generated.

My good wife comes in second. We’re really never that far apart to need to call.

But call I do on my way home from my Friday evening appointments, talking all the way from the parking lot to our driveway. I make the call to let her know I’m on my way home, giving her a chance to fire up the oven for the pizza.

And I’ve been doing this with one hand on the steering wheel and one hand to my ear holding the phone. It’s never been a problem. Not even close. It’s like talking to someone in the passenger seat. It’s hardly a distraction.

But it is a distraction, according to Illinois state law. And distractions cause crashes.

So, instead of holding the phone to your ear, you have to use hands-free technology, such as a Blue Tooth device, an earpiece, a headset or a speakerphone. The Blue Tooth is out of the question. People who use those devices look like they have cicadas sucking on their ears. Ugh.

An earpiece came with our cellphones, and that is what I am left to use.

I gave it the first try a couple of weeks ago, and I don’t see how it improves safety over a handheld phone. But greater minds than mine prevail in Illinois.

It took several minutes – before I started the car – to figure out how to plug the earpiece into the cellphone. Then I had to fairly jam the earpiece into my ear so it wouldn’t fall out or puncture my eardrum, then I made the call to my wife, and then I started the car. By the time I was in reverse, I was talking on the phone hands free.

The call was amazingly clear compared to the last time I tried using an earpiece years ago. I could hear my wife and she could hear me. Amazing.

But I was afraid the earpiece would fall out if I moved my head too quickly, and that’s enough to get into a crash. I am guessing the more I use the earpiece, the more comfortable I will become, and it won’t be long before it is second nature. Just like riding a bike. Hands free.

How to Use a Walkie Talkie Headset

The basic functioning of walkie talkie headsets or two way radios is similar to standard radios. They receive RW or radio waves over the air. Once radios have received the radio waves, they convert it into sound. However, two way radios also convert sound to radio waves and transmit it back to another receiver. In simple words, these special types of radios can receive and transmit a radio signal simultaneously. Moreover, such radios use two different radio frequencies. This ensures that they can receive and send signals at the same time.

Most of the two way radios in modern times also allow scanning. Through scanning, a user can easily check if anyone is sending a transmission on a particular frequency. If the radio which is being used detects a private line tone, it will stop scanning and lock on that particular channel. This will allow the user to speak and transmit on the same frequency. As mentioned earlier, modern radios allow a person to use multiple channels. However, a walkie talkie headset should be able to generate and transmit radio waves in many different frequencies. All the frequencies should have minute fluctuations with each other.

Applications Uses of Walkie Talkie Headsets

These special type of radios have always been in demand even with all the mobile phones and laptops. Such radios facilitate easy accessibility and instant communication. Moreover, you can communicate with a bunch of people at the same time. With such a radio, you don’t have to call everyone individually and spend a lot of your hard-earned money.

These radios can be used for many different purposes. They are often used in public safety, recreation camps, military training and other businesses. Moreover, they can also be used as toys for children. 2 way radios come in many different designs at affordable prices.

These type of radios can also be used in the medical industry. They can be quite useful in admitting patients or attending to people in emergency waiting areas. They also come in handy with outpatient clinics, pharmacies, and surgeries. Such radios can also be used in food industry. They can be used by waiters, kitchen staff and delivery staff in restaurants and so on.

Every person finds it easy to use these radios. Moreover, they are not as complex or difficult to use as mobile phones and other such communication devices. A walkie talkie headset is always the best option to communicate at work, play or home. Such radios can be used in many different situations. Even the most popular communication devices can not challenge the ease of use associated with such radios.

Record Calls (Literally) On The Go With Bluewire

Today’s smartphones really live up to their name, as they are filled with almost every tool we can imagine. From cameras that are more potent than most compact ones to high-end processing and computing power, they are as good as the next personal computer – I know for a fact that my actual phone is way better than the first computer I had, more than a decade ago.

There is one feature that most, if not all, smartphones come with by default, that is actually not used by most people: call recording. While the feature is quite handy on a situation where the phone is being used the normal way, there are some situations where it is not so much, like when you are using an earpiece and are away from the phone, not being able to hit “record”.

In fact, this is exactly the gap that Bluewire wants to fill. Developed by Senss, it is a project looking for financing on Indiegogo, and is announced as the world’s smartest Bluetooth headset call recorder, which is probably right. Using a common Bluetooth connectivity, it has the ability to record both ends of a smartphone or VoIP conversation, being also able to store it securely on the device itself.

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Bluewire is an earpiece itself but, if a user already has one and prefers to use it, that is not a problem, as Bluewire can record whatever call is passing through the phone. It has 16GB of memory, Qi wireless charging, built-in flashlight, accelerometer, two-way communication, and several other interesting features.

One of those features is NFC, Near Field Communication. If Bluewire is tapped to a smartphone after a phone call is made, that last call will be transferred and saved to the phone and sent to the user’s email inbox. Bluewire works as far as 33 meters from the smartphone.

Do you find Bluewire useful and plan to pledge for their Indiegogo campaign? Let us know in the comments.

Source - http://tech.co/record-calls-with-bluewire-2015-02

Do Two Way Radios Work on Cruise Ships?

Yes, 2 way radios DO work on cruise ships. However, because the same channels tend to be a bit overused, passengers can expect a fair amount of chatter and signal interference when using their radios.

I suppose the 2 way radios/walkie talkies would be the best option. But, how important is being in constant communication with the rest of your family anyway? A ship, while large, isn’t huge. If you know the general area where people will be, you could walk over and find them. Preset arranged meeting times and places would work as well. People were able to get along fairly well without being able to directly communicate with each other at every moment of the day

So, aside from the option of setting pre-arranged meeting times, a two way radio isn’t a terrible idea, especially if you have kids. Many people reading this might simply ask why they can’t use their mobile phones. That is a very good question, after all…

If you’re going on a cruise this summer (or anytime, really), you need to be aware that your mobile phone is going to cause some problems.

Many cruise passengers are unaware and/or totally ill prepared for this fact and the cruise companies themselves are at least partly to blame for the lack of information in this area. So, will your mobile phone work at sea?

The answer is most often always “You can subscribe to our cruise line cell phone network.” What they won’t tell you is the rates you will be paying. You certainly won’t be able to find them online, and to get a proper answer, you’ll have to call the cruise line to get a full break down of what they charge for access to their cell networks. As a company that sets their own international calling rates for the Talk Abroad SIM Card, we can see the cruise ship networks in our list, and it does not look good. If you subscribe to their network, you’ll be paying anything from $4 ~ $8 per minute, depending on your location and who you are calling. Don’t forget also that they’ll be charging you for receiving inbound calls

As we’ll soon see, taking a mobile phone on a cruise can represent a logistical nightmare. At the same time, however, many of us feel naked without a phone?

More problems are presented in the form of scheduled stops (although these can also represent opportunities for a higher – and cheaper – level of connectivity).

If the ship is close to the coastline, and has multiple port of call stops, you’ll typically be able to get a terrestrial signal from the nearest land cell phone tower – up to a mile from the coast. It’s highly unlikely that you will be connected with 3G speed signals, as evidenced in my previous blog, you will need to have a low-wave 3G frequency like 800 or 900 Mhz – frequencies not typically associated with phones manufactured for North American consumers. So what can be done? You can rent an international cell phone that works in port, and a short way out to sea. If you really must stay connected on your boat, get in touch with your cruise travel agency and request information about the on-board cell phone rates and subscription fees

So, using mobile phones on a cruise is both difficult and supremely costly, but arranging a meeting time is also likely to cause more than a few headaches. two way radios have their problems, but may in fact be the best way to keep in contact, depending, of course, on how important a factor this is for you.

The size of modern cruise ships are such that they are usually measured against small cities, this means that communications are even more important than before. Experts in two way radio communication are 2wayradionline.co.uk

How Does Spy Earpiece Work?

The spy earpiece is a gadget of the future that facilitates our lives. With the spy earpiece invisible communication is performed in most troublesome situations when cover assistance is necessary.

The main feature of the spy earpiece is its complete invisibility. First of all, the spy earpiece goes in beige hue that is very close to skin color. So when you insert it into the ear, nobody can even notice it. Besides, the spy earpiece can boast of super tiny dimensions that ensure absolute invisibility of the gadget when it is in the ear.

The good news is the spy earpiece is available on the market in diverse gadget sets. The most popular of them are Bluetooth Set, Watch Set, MP3 Set and Glasses Set. Each one of the sets listed above has an in-built transmitter and a microphone (in the loop for Bluetooth and MP3, in the bow of the glasses and on the reverse side of the watch). Thanks to the transmitter, the gadget gets connected to the cell phone. And thanks to the sensitive microphone your partner will hear your every word even if you whisper. So, as you can see the spy earpiece set consists of the transmitter with an embedded microphone and a spy earpiece with a battery.

It is pretty easy to use the spy earpiece. What you have to do is the following sequence of steps:

· Put the transmitter. If you use the Bluetooth or MP3 spy earpiece set, you are supposed to put on the loop round your neck. Make sure that the loop is properly hidden under your clothes. For Spy earpiece Watch set you put on the watch on your wrist, and for Spy earpiece Glasses set – just use it like ordinary glasses.

· Insert the battery into the spy earpiece. Every set comes with a detailed guidance for that, so don’t be afraid of doing something wrong. Anyway, if the quality of sound is unsatisfactory, try to change the position of the battery.

· Put the spy earpiece into the ear. Here you should remember that you always have to clean ear canals beforehand. Otherwise, the spy earpiece filter will choke up with earwax and sound will deteriorate significantly. In the worst case the spy earpiece will fail to work.

· Make a call. When you are ready with preparations just make a call and put the cell phone into your pocket. You won’t need it any more. Now the covert communication is established. You can hear what your partner is saying.

· Pull the spy earpiece out. This is very easy to do thanks to a special ejection cord every spy earpiece has. You can see it in any picture.

· Take out the battery. Be careful about pulling out the battery. You have to do it only with the help of a paper pin so that not to damage the spy earpiece. In case you won’t take it out, the battery will discharge.

With the help of the spy earpiece you will never feel embarrassed and confused when speaking in public, writing a test, having an interview or taking an exam. The spy earpiece will help you to feel confident and be successful.

Source – http://osanellona.hubpages.com/hub/How-Does-Spy-Earpiece-Work

What Is Audio Surveillance?

This was originally posted on this website, credit should go them as this is a interesting article.

Audio surveillance is the act of listening to third-party conversations and recording them. This technique is frequently used by law enforcement, private detectives and government spy agencies. Most audio surveillance consists of either bugging a room, wearing a wire, tapping a phone or distance listening. Each provides distinct advantages and disadvantages, depending on the situation.

audio surveillanceWiretapping is one of the most common and simple form of audio surveillance. This is preferred because it is highly inconspicuous and allows for two sides of a conversation to be clearly recorded. Small audio devices, commonly called bugs, are attached to the internal circuitry of a telephone to pick up a conversation. A signal is wirelessly transmitted to another device that records the conversation. The drawback of this method is getting access to a subject’s telephone to properly wiretap it.

A room microphone is another audio surveillance technique that often is utilized. This involves planting a wireless microphone in a room to pick up conversations. Disguised room microphones are available to look like pens, clocks, stuffed animals and a variety of other covert forms. This microphone sends a signal to a receiver, just like a wiretap does, and the signal can be directly recorded. The disadvantage here is access to some rooms and getting only one side of a phone conversation if it takes place in that room.

Concealable transmitters known as body wires are well-known devices that have been featured in many television shows and movies. A small microphone and transmitting device are worn under the clothes of a person in order to send a signal back to a receiver and record a conversation. This allows the person wearing the wire to ask questions and get specific details that simply listening to other people’s conversations could not provide. The disadvantage of this method is getting access to the person needed to be recorded and also concealing the microphone in a way that hides it but allows for clear recording.

Long-distance microphones are another covert means of audio surveillance. A parabolic microphone, often called a shotgun microphone because of its long shape, has a powerful ability to pick up conversations up to 300 feet (91.4 m) away. Its main disadvantage is its high sensitivity. It can pick up other noises and cannot function if obstructions, such as trees and automobiles, are between the microphone and the conversation.