How Many 2 way radios Can Work on the Same Channel?

Theoretically, you can use an unlimited amount of walkie-talkies on the same channel (although in practice you might experience a few problems if you took that suggestion literally). Basically, there isn’t really a set limit. You could use as many as you like provided they are set up correctly. Anybody set to the right channel and in range at the time of transmission would then be able to pick up the signal and respond to it.

Most radios have access to 8 channels. These channels each have 38 separate ‘identification tones’. The user sets his/her channel up with the desired tone and then only other users who know the channel/tone will be able to hear the transmissions. As a result, there are, in any given area, about 304 different combinations, so signal interference is unlikely to affect you.

Please do not interpret this answer as saying that your radio has access to 304 possible channels. It does not. It will likely only have access to 8. Some less reputable manufacturers tend to falsely imply access to 304 channels; this is simply not the case. You will have access to 304 possible tone/channel combinations, that’s all.

To better explain the CTCSS codes and how they work; we’ll include a little information from Amherst.co.uk’s FAQ page.

“CTCSS stands for “Continuous Tone Coded Squelch System”. These codes are also often called “Privacy codes” If a CTCSS tone is selected; a CTCSS sub-audible tone is transmitted along with the regular voice audio by the transmitting radio. The receiving radio, set to the same CTCSS tone, will only receive audio if it contains that sub-tone. Interference from other users on the same frequency is therefore rejected (unless they are also on the same sub-tone). This is a way of allowing groups of users of walkie-talkies on the same channel to avoid hearing messages from other nearby users”.

So, in conclusion, you can probably use as many walkie-talkies as you like on the same channel. As long as the units in question are of the same type (either VHF or UHF) and have the same CTCSS setup, then you simply shouldn’t have a problem. You also shouldn’t suffer from signal interference due to other users (although you may still experience signal loss/interference/degradation from other sources). We have talked about combating signal loss elsewhere, so please see the other questions if you have any problems in this area.

 SOURCES

http://www.amherst.co.uk/walkietalkie/walkie-talkie-radio-faq-basics.htm

http://www.homephonesonline.co.uk/information/qa-walkie-talkies.htm

Benefits of Two Way Radios to the Hotel Industry

Over the years, hotel communication has had to change and develop, becoming more and more efficient than it was. This is courtesy of the advancement in technology over these years. Passed are the days that Two way radios were exclusively for police official use. Nowadays, these pieces of technology that have been improved and made even better are used for hotel communications. These state of the art technology have lots of benefits that any of us have been recipients of in one way or the other. Being in the hospitality industry, I can outline with ease some of the major benefits that these 2 way radios have brought into hospitality.

First and foremost, the service offered to the customers in the hotels has been improved. When taking orders in the restaurants back in the day, the waiters had to go all the way back to the kitchen to request for the order. Okay, this was not much of a problem for the small establishments. However, as the hotel grew and the number of employees grew, the kitchen area would get so crowded that out was difficult to get the job done. With the new 2-way radio technology however, all the waitress have to do is call out the order through the gadget and it is received on the other end saving on the time.

Also, being in the hotel business, I can testify that just like in any other business, there are major up and downs. However, unlike many other businesses, there is no space for screwing up. A single mishaps can cost you millions. The best way to avoid this from happening, is by communicating with the manager and airing out issues that might be there. Communication is key in this business and the sooner an issue is sorted out the faster you can move on and provide quality service to your customers.

Security. Do we really have to spell out the benefits that 2 way radios have with regards to security in the hospitality industry. The hotel industry harbors people of different kinds and who have different intentions. As such, the necessary measures need to be taken to ensure the security of the staff as well as the other peaceable customers. The rate at which the security personnel react to distress calls can be the determining factor to how the security emergency turns out. The Two way radios have greatly increased the speed in which the security personnel respond to security threats and also ensure that they are on top of every situation as every member in the hotel informs them when there is a security risk.

In addition to the above benefits, the Two way radios are cost effective and are also very easy to use. With the Two way radios, the management does not have to pay any network provider so that they can communicate. This reduces the cost of operation of the hotel by a great margin. To talk through to the other person on the other end of the line, all you have to do is press a button on the front and you will get through. It is as easy as that.

The benefits of the 2-way radios are numerous. This makes them a major asset to any hotel.

Whats’s a Covert Earpiece?

Thankyou for reading my blog, here’s a piece i really enjoyed reading. With their authorization i can repost it. I write plenty of my own content, but occasionally post other articles i find fascinating, thankyou for reading.

A covert earpiece is a miniature earpiece worn by an individual while being effectively hidden from plain view. It operates as a radio accessory in times when a user does not want other people to know she or he is communicating with others using radio earbuds. Also known as an invisible earpiece or a surveillance earpiece, a covert earpiece is often worn by government agents, corporate security personnel, undercover law enforcement officers and corporate as well as government spies.

covert earpiece

While many occupations require the use of a radio headset for communication, a covert earpiece is primarily used in instances where communication is of an extremely private and sensitive nature. This is common in cases of private security details and surveillance projects. Sometimes people also use a covert earpiece to defraud businesses and others. Examples of such instances would include someone using an invisible earpiece to cheat on an exam or to defraud a casino by receiving remote information while playing a game.

On-air television personalities may also use a covert earpiece, which is not distracting to viewers, but allows the person to hear relevant feedback from producers and engineers in order to make sure a taping or live appearance flows smoothly. Individuals may also wear a covert earpiece when making a public speech. By doing so, the speaker can receive important cues or changes in a speech without the audience even being aware that communication is taking place between someone located behind the scenes and the individual delivering the speech.

Some covert earpieces are accompanied by a discreet microphone, which enables two-way communication. These are commonly used by security forces with a need for such communication, particularly during surveillance operations. These types of accessories are not only convenient because they feature hands-free operation, but also because they allow undercover security forces to blend in with crowds without having to use a visible walkie-talkie system of communication.

A covert earpiece does not contain any visible wires and is designed to fit inside the ear without being noticeable to the general public. Some devices are even designed to fit on a pair of eyeglasses while amplifying sound inside a person’s ear. An inductive wire is sometimes worn around the person’s neck, but is covered by clothing so as not to be discovered by onlookers. This wire is not connected to the covert earpiece, but connects to a separate radio device that helps modulate sound.

The Icom IC-F4029SDR: A PMR 445 Licence Free Radio

You’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about 2 way Radio’s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article

Professional Digital Licence Free Transceiver

The IC-F4029SDR professional digital licence-free transceiver utilises the latest 6.25kHz ultra narrow digital voice technologies, providing digital clarity, razor sharp signalling performance and a level of secrecy from less congested dedicated digital PMR channels.

The IC-F4029SDR was recently featured on Channel 5’s “The Gadget Show” winning a comparison test against another leading manufacturer.

DIGITAL PMR 446 FEATURES

The IC-4029SDR utilizes 4FSK/FDMA modulation and 6.25kHz digital narrow channel spacing, which is half the channel spacing of the existing analogue PMR 446 system. This way, the 100kHz band width allocated for digital PMR 446 is efficiently divided into 16 channels, or twice the current analogue voice channel capacity making this product incredibly spectrum efficient.

A Path from analogue PMR 446 to digital PMR 446 in one unit

By changing the channel setting, the IC-F4029SDR can be used on existing analogue PMR 446 channels. This provides users with an upgrade path from analogue PMR 446 to digital PMR 446 in one unit. Being analogue/digital compatible, any businesses or private users currently using analogue PMR446 can begin replacing their analogue radios with IC-F4029SDR and enjoy digital quality as well as relief from congested spectrum.

32-status messages

32 codes of prefixed status messages can be sent and received. 16-character messages and 6 types of alert beeps sound that for call reception, are programmable for each message.

“Common ID” group code

This function is similar to an analogue CTCSS/DTCS code. By setting 1–254 common ID codes, the IC-F4029SDR opens its squelch only when a matched code is received. It provides quiet stand-by and group call functions while sharing a channel with several groups. The code “255” is the fixed code for an all stations call.

Security of digital voice

‘Eavesdropping’ by current scanner receivers is impossible at this stage. Since there are no other competing radios, initial users will have a high level of security in digital voice communication mode.

Additional Digital Features

Group call functions (up to 254 digital codes available)

Programmable 32 status message of up to 16 characters each can be sent to individual or group member radios when in digital mode. This is configurable by a PC

In addition to Icom default channel settings, other channel zones are preprogrammed to have matched settings with Kenwood and Motorola PMR446 models currently on the market. These radios can be sold to match Motorola/Kenwood current analogue configuration reducing the necessity to reprogram radios for customer’s fleets consisting of non- Icom radios.

ANALOGUE PMR 446 FEATURES

“Smart-Ring” and “Ringer” function

The “Smart-Ring” function checks the availability of your group members within the operating range. The “Ringer” function is used for manually sending a ring tone instead of a voice call. 16 types of ringing tones are available.

Tone find function

The tone find function allows you to find a tone used in a channel to decode a tone.

Built-in CTCSS/DTCS

50 CTCSS tones and 84 DTCS tones provide quiet stand-by. DTCS inverse mode is also programmable.

Lithium-Ion battery pack and rapid charger as standard

The IC-F4029SDR series shares Lithium-Ion battery packs with the IC-F3062, IC-F3022, IC-F34G and IC-F15 series. The IC-F4029SDR series is supplied with the BP-231 1150mAh li-Ion battery pack (provides 9 hours* of operating time) and BC-160 desktop rapid charger as standard. An optional BP-232 larger capacity battery pack and BP-230 economical battery packs are also available. Lithium-Ion batteries provide larger capacity and a longer operating time than a Ni-Cd or Ni-MH battery pack and allow flexible charging without memory effect.

Small and lightweight body

The IC-F4029SDR has a fixed type antenna and weighs just 280g (including BP-231). It measures only 53 x 195 x 32.5mm including the antenna. The aluminium die-cast chassis and polycarbonate casing combination is designed for durability. A rugged dual-rail guide chassis securely locks the battery to the back of the radio.

Alphanumeric LCD

The IC-F4029SDR incorporates an 8-character 14 segment alphanumeric LCD. An automatic LCD backlight is employed for night-time operation.

IC-F4029SDR Additional Features

Shares the same battery packs and accessories as the IC-F15/F34 series

Power on password

2-step Power save function

A first in the market, professional digital licence free radio

A Path from analogue PMR 446 to digital PMR 446 in one unit

Fantastic audio quality

Useful communication tool for light commercial users (initial users can benefit from security of digital voice)

Compact, lightweight body

High capacity lithium-Ion battery pack and rapid charger as standard

8-character alphanumeric display

32-status messages for digital PMR 446

“Common ID” group code

Existing analogue PMR 446 channels available with CTCSS/DTCS tones

Optional headset provides hands-free operation

2 year warranty on transceiver, 1 year warranty on accessories.

What is a Communications Engineering

Communications engineering is a disparate array of technological disciplines brought together under one all-encompassing banner. The disciplines considered to be part of a communication engineer’s skill set include telecommunications, mobile phone networks and Internet maintenance (but are by no means limited to those examples).

As we wrote earlier this month, any technology that aids in communication, from a walkie-talkie to a Skype account, is technically a communication technology; therefore, it also follows that anybody who works in these different areas can call him/herself a communications engineer.

The theory behind this move is that communications technology is becoming more streamlined and, to some extent, more homogenized (think of the ubiquity of mobile phones and social media) and so, it makes sense to bring communications technology together as a single subject as well.

As I type this, it is actually possible to get a Degree in Communications Engineering (as a single subject) from many universities worldwide. However, communications engineers frequently hold other Degrees such as electrical engineering, physics, telecommunications and/or computer science.

The sort of students that apply for courses like this (and subsequently work in the related areas) are generally logistically minded, tech-savvy people who are comfortable learning new skills and adapt quickly to new technology. Certainly, the money can be good for a decent engineer with a good reputation and an up-to-date skill set. Industries that rely on the expedient exchange of information (news networks, the stock exchange, big businesses and etc) should be the goal for the ambitious communications engineer (as well as the eager graduate).

Communications engineering is a vast and somewhat esoteric subject, because it combines so many different disciplines. Ideally, good communications engineers would be just as able to handle microwave engineering as they would a downed computer network, so it takes a smart cookie to be really good at the job.

Communications engineers are often quite business savvy as well. A big part of the job is dealing with clients or management, making presentations and working effectively as part of a team. Experience of modern business practice is not essential, but from the looks of things, it certainly helps.

The vast majority of communications engineers work for specific telecommunications companies and/or manufacturers, although some are self-employed as consultants or on fixed contracts.

According to Targetjobs.co.uk, typical job responsibilities for a communications engineer include: undertaking site surveys, agreeing to and staying within a client budget, staying up-to-date with technological information, problem solving (obviously!), creating test procedures, creating ‘worst case scenario’ plans for companies to follow and presenting companies/clients with the best way to manage their communication systems.

Naked Pics Can Be Retrieved From Factory Re-Set Phones. Really

A Czech-Republic based security firm (Avast), have ruined everybody’s fun by pointing out that, even when your old phone is subject to a full ‘factory re-set’, those ‘special pictures’ your lover sent you can actually be retrieved by a third party.

Now, I imagine that there are two types of people reading this article:

People who are now wondering if their naked selfies are being perved over by complete strangers at this very moment (it is possible, I’m afraid).

…And the people who are expectantly clutching their second-hand phones and waiting for me to get to the bit where I explain how to obtain these pictures (shame on you, but hang in there, we’ll get to it in a bit!).

Well, whichever you are, you should know that the firm used publicly available forensic technology to extract, not only naked selfies, but ALL SORTS of other data from second hand phones they purchased on eBay (however, they were clearly most excited about the selfies – computer nerds don’t get out much, after all).

According to experts, the only way to PERMANENTLY delete these images from your phone is to destroy your phone.

Now, if you’re the smug type of reader, who thinks ‘I never took a naked selfie, so I’m in the clear’…Well, I’m here to tell you that you may be facing an even more embarrassing problem than that of a stranger on the Internet getting a gander at your goodies, because other data extracted from the test phones included texts, emails and Google search data.

I’m also here to tell you that you’re a pretty boring person.

I’ll bet you wish they’d been distracted by your bits now, don’t you?

Of the 20 phones examined by Avast, about 40,000 photos were extracted and about 750 of them depicted women in the nip (or near to it), whilst 250 or so depicted (to quote Avast) “the previous user’s manhood”.

According to Avast, “Deleting files from your Android phone before selling it or giving it away is not enough. You need to overwrite your files, making them irretrievable.”

Even then, older smartphones sometimes only erase the indexing of the data and not the data itself. To make matters worse, the tools required to retrieve this data can be easily downloaded from the Internet (and no, I’m not telling you where!)

So, the moral of the story appears to be that, if you want to continue getting those ‘special messages’ from that ‘special someone’ then for Pete’s sake…Don’t show them this article.

SOURCES

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-28264446

What are Earbuds?

You’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about earpiece’s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article

Earbuds are headphones, typically made out of a hard plastic material, that fit inside the ear, just outside of the ear canal. These aren’t the same thing as ear canal headphones, which have a rubber tip and seal within a listener’s ear canal.

Several portable music devices, like mp3s and Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), come with earbuds when the device is purchased. Earbuds are a less expensive alternative to ear canal headphones or other listening devices. Consumers tend to purchase earbuds for their convenience, as they are easier to carry around than other headphones because of their small size.

This style of headphone also tends to be more inexpensive than other kinds, like ear canal headphones, circumaural headphones that fit outside the ears, or the supra-aural headphones that have pads that are placed on top of the ears, rather than around or inside them. Circumaural headphones are typically used in recording studios and supra-aural headphones can still be purchased at some stores, though these kinds of devices have given way to headphones that fit within the ear.

Because of the design of earbuds, there can be a few drawbacks to owning them as opposed to owning another style of headphone. First, the rigid design of earbuds can sometimes make it difficult for them to fit comfortably inside a listener’s ear. If they’re too large or too small, they can either slip out of the ear or won’t fit inside it at all. Another problem reported by consumers is that because earbuds don’t seal the ear canal, the sound quality is muddled through other ambient noises.

Essentially, most earbuds work the same as other headphones and the set-up is relatively simple. Wires move up from the electronic device that is putting out sound, such as an mp3 player. These wires connect to a voice coil. The coil is attached to a cone, which is flexible and plastic. A magnet is attached to the back of the earbuds. When sound passes up through the wires and to the magnet, the voice coil becomes electromagnetic and moves up and down with the sound. The cone then pushes the sound out through the earbud and into the listener’s ear.

When listening to earbuds or any other type of headphones, physicians recommend to keep the volume at a reasonable level, as research had proven that prolonged exposure to high noise levels can lead to permanent hearing loss. Prolonged listening to loud noises, including music, puts unnecessary stress on the hairs in the cochlea. This causes permanent damage to the hairs and can eventually lead to hearing loss.

IED blast in Afghanistan inspires ex-Green Beret to reinvent two-way radio

Some of the expert writers on the internet are at a really high level that i ponder if any of them have ever written a book? so from time to time i like to focus on these admirable content pieces and here’s one i thought was interesting the other day.

U.S. Army Special Forces Sgt. Tom Katis was headed through the mountains from Asadabad to Jalalabad in Northeastern Afghanistan to catch a plane out of the country for a week of leave in January 2003 when 70 pounds of plastic explosives buried in the road detonated directly under the lead vehicle in his convoy, setting off an ambush.

Shooting erupted from the reeds along the Kunar River, and Katis found his crew switching among numerous radio channels to call in air support and a medical helicopter for two wounded soldiers, as well as to update his commander and coordinate with nearby units.

Tom Katis

“I had to take guys off team frequencies to monitor empty traffic. All of a sudden, the team was not on the same frequency,” said Katis. “We all had radios that cost $15,000 each, and we’re yelling at each other.”

At that moment, Katis decided that even when operating as designed, radios were too difficult to use in combat. Live-only microphones caused missed connections. Choices had to be made quickly between satellite and line-of-sight systems.

That trauma was the kernel for Voxer, a San Francisco-based “push-to-talk” smartphone application developer that Katis co-founded in 2007 and hopes will take a big chunk of the multi-billion-dollar two-way radio hardware and services industry.

After finishing his second Army tour in 2003, Katis immediately co-founded a private security firm called Triple Canopy that has grown to 8,000 employees by catering to military, government and corporate customers around the world.

The radio idea stuck with Katis, however, who had worked a stint at a startup in Silicon Valley from 1999 to 2001.

“The first thing that was obvious was that everything needed to go on the Internet,” said Katis, a graduate of Yale University with a bachelor’s degree in ethics, politics and economics who interrupted his business career to re-enroll in the military after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

At Triple Canopy, Katis in 2004 met Matt Ranney, who became Voxer’s co-founder and CTO. What they and early Voxer employees later created was an Internet-based hybrid between a walkie-talkie and a group messaging application that enables users to talk live or send voice, text and photo messages that can be retrieved at will, all while displaying individual users’ locations. Venture investors to date have funded their efforts with $30 million.

It’s a deceptively simple system, according to Gartner, but Voxer has received 126 patents around the world to protect its inventions, which Katis says provide a platform for significantly improving communications in the private sector and government.

In May 2011, Voxer released a free version of its app and, though it was initially slow to catch on, it exploded to nearly 70 million users by 2012.

At that point Voxer had to choose whether to focus on the consumer app and generate money through advertising or some other vehicle — a vision that many other entrepreneurs were chasing — or try to build a communications product that businesses and governments would be willing to buy. For Katis and his cohorts, the choice was clear.

“A free consumer app was not going to solve the problems we want to solve,” said Katis in an interview in Voxer’s San Francisco headquarters in the historic Phelan Building on Market Street. “I think I can build a much bigger company than that. This is a hundred-billion-dollar industry that I think we can go and take a very meaningful piece of.”

Katis still loves and intends to keep the free app, but Voxer turned its attentions to building more sophisticated features, including encryption, a web-browser-based version for administrators, an installed appliance that companies or government agencies (think three letters) can run themselves and a function that mimics the way two-way radios squawk out transmissions in real-time.

Voxer launched a roughly $10-a-month-per-user business version in June 2013 and, while Katis says the first year was very much a learning process concerning how to make corporate sales, the company just scored its biggest customer yet, the North American division of a major international automobile manufacturer, the identity of which it cannot yet make public. In addition, Roto-Rooter, the national plumbing repair business, in April started to roll Voxer out to about 900 people, a quarter of its field staff, and Voxer has trials underway with various U.S. agencies.

Most of the sales to date have been to companies that asked to upgrade from the free app, said Katis, adding that the company is now hiring in sales and marketing.

One inbound customer was Chris Marino, owner of Xtreme Snow Pros, a snow removal service in Mahwah, N.J., who used the business version last winter for the first time after testing out many different two-way radio systems. Most of the other systems required hardware purchases were more expensive and less versatile, he said.

Marino’s staff balloons during snow season from five to 70 employees with seasonal help, and Voxer lets him communicate with each one individually or all at once from his desk.

“Voxer Business was an incredible asset to us,” Marino said. “It’s a truly great product.”

 

A look into the surprisingly popular world of ‘spy’ gadgetry

British comedian Jack Dee probably said it best, “Men like to use drills because secretly, we think they’re guns”. Tools just bring out our inner 007.

He’s right. Men like gadgets for the same reason. We can’t deny it, there’s just something unassailably cool about a tool that you can use, but that no one else knows about.

Whether you’re prancing around your house pointing a Black & Decker at imaginary henchmen, or fondly imagining that your fountain pen doubles as some sort of deadly offensive weapon, its OK to admit that you like the idea of gadgets.

spy earpiece

If you’re reading this and nodding, then you are almost certainly a man (or else, a bit of a Tomboy, which is fine too). In which case, you probably found this article whilst searching for a ‘spy earpiece’ online. Ergo, the sort of person who buys a this is, well, someone just like you.

If, however, you clicked this page because you want to know what sort of person uses such a device (or indeed, what, if any, its practical applications are), then you’ve come to the right place, ma’am.

Its not all James Bond wannabes, you know.

Business professionals cunningly utilize spy earpieces to receive information in real time as they negotiate huge deals and contracts. They also employ such gadgets when giving lengthy and complex presentations to superiors or potential customers. This goes double (or even triple) for public speakers.

Security personnel will also use spy earpieces, as surprising as that may be to read. Often, the security professional is used as a deterrent; large, imposing men and women are geared up with walkie-talkies and sharp suits or black uniforms in order to encourage would-be troublemakers to think twice. However, it is also common for security guards to operate in plain clothes, keeping an eye on potential situations discreetly and quietly. For this, they use a spy earpiece. For the same reasons, even undercover police have been known to employ spy earpieces.

Then, of course there are students (yes, we had to get to it eventually). These are a great way to help in your exams AND feel like James Bond at the same time. Of course, we’d never condone the use of our products in such a way, but nevertheless, it does happen. Amazingly, the time spent preparing a reliable body of information and then having an accomplice drip feed the correct answers to you via the earpiece would probably be better spent actually learning the material in the first place. However, students can also use spy earpieces in presentations in much the same way that businesspeople do.

Recently, we’ve come across articles online which suggest that even the unemployed are getting in on the act, using spy earpieces in job interviews in order to come across as qualified and knowledgeable.

So, the earpiece appeals to more than just the gadget-crazed would-be 007. Spy earpieces are used by a broad cross-section of the community, not just by men with a little too much time on their hands!

What is Communications Technology?

Broadly speaking, the term ‘communications technology’ can refer to any technology that allows its users to communicate with one another. Using this (admittedly loose) definition, two-way radios and mobile phones fall into the category of ‘communications technology’.

The term also refers to computers and computer-related work. Here in the UK, schoolchildren study a subject called ‘ICT‘ this stands for ‘Information and Technology’ (although when this rapidly ageing writer was at school, it was known simply as ‘IT’ or, ‘Information Technology’).

As the Internet has become a more and more prevalent part of our society, communications over longer distances have become significantly easier. In fact, such communications are easier now than at any other time in Human history. Ergo, it stands to reason that computers should be considered as a prime form of communications technology.

communications technologyBasic, everyday acts such as checking your emails, updating your Facebook or Twitter feed, answering the phone, or taking Skype calls are all a part of ‘communications technology’ as are the two-way radios used by public transport, security firms and the emergency services.

A person who makes a living by working with ‘comms tech’ is likely involved in the designing, creating, implementing or maintaining of communicational systems. Such systems can include radio networks, mobile phone providers, telephone companies, even television. It is a broad and ever-expanding field, which makes it difficult to ascertain exactly what a person actually does if they list it as their job title.

When somebody tells you that they are a plumber, for example, you get a broad idea of what they do for a living all day. If I tell you that I am a professional copywriter, you at least have some notion as to what that entails. A person who works in the field of ‘comm tech’ could be doing almost anything.

In case you’re wondering, the Internet itself can be considered as a communication technology, given that any person who uploads videos or writes blogs is communicating the very second that those blogs are read or those videos are watched.

Telecom’s is a huge field and, as I think you’ll agree, a pretty important one. Without the ability to communicate with others, either via short distances on your mobile or much longer distances (such as the distance between our office in the UK and your home on the African continent), this world would be a vastly different place.